Peralta Community College District's Only Student-Run Publication
Peralta Community College District's only student-run publication.

The Citizen

Peralta Community College District's only student-run publication.

The Citizen

Peralta Community College District's only student-run publication.

The Citizen

Peralta Trustee Paulina Gonzalez Brito addresses the crowd at Berkeley City College’s 50th anniversary celebration. The event featured a block party along with a groundbreaking ceremony for the college’s new Milvia Street building. (Photo: Marcus Creel/PCCD)
‘We’re still rising’: BCC celebrates 50th anniversary
College throws block party and breaks ground on new building
Sam O'Neil, Associate Editor • May 6, 2024
College of Alameda jazz professor Glen Pearson demonstrates his musical talent on his classroom piano. Hes one of the newest members of the Count Basie Orchestra, a historic 18-piece jazz ensemble that took home a Grammy this year.
The humble Grammy-winning pianist leading CoA’s music program
Desmond Meagley, Staff Writer • March 4, 2024
Archives
PCCDs classified employees pose for a pic at the first-ever professional development day for classified professionals. PCCD Chancellor Tammeil Gilkerson reflected on the event in her report to the Board of Trustees. (Source: PCCD)
Peralta’s leadership search, CCC public safety earmark, and “rumors” discussed at 4/9 meeting of PCCD Trustees
Desmond Meagley, Staff Writer • April 24, 2024
Student Trustee Naomi Vasquez, who was sworn onto the Peralta Community College District Board of Trustees on Dec. 12, 2023, sees her role as an opportunity to uplift her fellow students and advocate for the value of a community college education.
Student Trustee Naomi Vasquez aims to lift voices and empower students at PCCD
Isabelly Sabô Barbosa, Social Media Editor • February 28, 2024
Archives

    The dangers of watching TV

    Most Americans watch hours of TV each day. They have their favorite comedy, drama or sports programs and watch them live or record them and watch them later. Some people get hooked on daytime stories, reality TV, talk shows or informational channels and religiously watch them.
    A.C. Nielsen said the average American watches more than 4 hours of TV each day, which is 28 hours/week, 2 months/year and 9 out of 65 years. This is an extraordinary amount of time that could be spent doing constructive things.
    People know where to find food. More Americans are overweight and obese than right-sized. If they insist on serving cheap, toxic food, why do we have to watch fast food commercials? People need to eat healthy food and less of it.
    Many politicians spend millions of dollars, so they can belittle their opponents and boast about their accomplishments. In North Carolina’s 2014 Senate race, Democrat incumbent Kay Hagan and Republican candidate Thom Tillis have spent about $27 million each on TV commercials. However, most political TV ads don’t inform voters about the candidates’ vision or ideas.
    Many other products that are routinely advertised on TV are harmful. These include cars that pollute the environment, alcohol, soda, pharmaceutical drugs, pizzas that are made with horrible ingredients and detergents that should be banned.
    The news and educational programs are typically watched less, but it doesn’t have to be this way. We could say no to products advertised on TV and demand higher quality. We could also avoid some programs and use TV like a learning tool.
    People will eat anything, so they’ll advertise anything. People don’t care that gas-powered cars pollute, so auto manufacturers advertise those on TV.
    Advertisers capitalize on human weakness and TV shows exploit it, but we can put TV in its place if we hold every double-minded word, condescending look and authoritative tone accountable.

    About the Contributor
    In the fall of 2019, The Laney Tower rebranded as The Citizen and launched a new website. These stories were ported over from the old Laney Tower website, but byline metadata was lost in the port. However, many of these stories credit the authors in the text of the story. Some articles may also suffer from formatting issues. Future archival efforts may fix these issues.  
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