Peralta Community College District's Only Student-Run Publication
Peralta Community College District's only student-run publication.

The Citizen

Peralta Community College District's only student-run publication.

The Citizen

Peralta Community College District's only student-run publication.

The Citizen

A PCCD board meeting held during spring break included really good news for the funding of retiree benefits, as well as the approval of $1.36 million for the new Laney Tower elevators.   Pictured: New designs for CoAs revamped aviation facility, which were approved by the board. (Source: AE3 Partners)
'Really good news' for retiree benefits, Laney Tower elevators set for replacement, and more at 3/26 meeting for PCCD trustees
Desmond Meagley, Staff Writer • April 7, 2024
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In this monthly column, I chat with folks from the Peralta community and ask ten questions aiming to make everyone more relatable to each other. (Graphic by Randi Cross/The Citizen)
Tea with Tamara: Drew Burgess, art faculty at College of Alameda
Tamara Copes, Columnist • February 21, 2024
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Archives

    10 years of Eco Arts at Steingart

    The Eco-Arts Exhibition is a call to action to fix our planet.This year marks the 10-year anniversary of the Eco Arts class at Laney College. To celebrate, Andreé Thompson, Sharon Siskin and their students decided to show numerous pieces of art that have come from the class throughout the years in an exhibition in the June Steingart Gallery, lobby of the Laney Administration Building. The show spans the decade of works from the class, which was initially offered in 2005 as a collaboration with Zakary Zide of the Oakland Museum of California. 
    The class teaches the students to not only express themselves, but to do so with an open heart and critical mind, where the preservation of our earth is concerned. After a short history of the environmental and social art movements, they are required to submit (at least) three pages worth of research, with statistics, before Thompson signs off and the pupils can begin their art. 
    Generally, the work is representative of not only the earth, but some aspect of it that speaks loudly to the artist. 
    The class, and by extension, exhibit, features art of all natures — mixed media, paintings, abstract sculptures and a 22-foot-long Sturgeon which is hung to represent the decline in both population and size of this once-formidable, ancient beast. 
    Instructors of this class have seen students from all walks of life, and the art is largely representative of their individual backgrounds, with their pasts as diverse as their art. From former and current faculty members to all walks of the community, their output is loud and individualistic, but with a central message: if we do not fix our planet, we are doomed. 
    This is represented most strongly in two pieces: a beautiful painting of bees buzzing around swirling, abstract flowers and a plush shark stuffed with debris and detritus. Another student decided to harken back to his roots, being half African-American and half American Indian, and paint portrait with great symbolic meaning. 
    The Eco-Arts class will continue for many years to come, but you can only see their works on display at Steingart Gallery, located in the lobby of the Administration building, until Sept. 30.

    About the Contributor
    In the fall of 2019, The Laney Tower rebranded as The Citizen and launched a new website. These stories were ported over from the old Laney Tower website, but byline metadata was lost in the port. However, many of these stories credit the authors in the text of the story. Some articles may also suffer from formatting issues. Future archival efforts may fix these issues.  
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