Peralta Community College District's Only Student-Run Publication
Peralta Community College District's only student-run publication.

The Citizen

Peralta Community College District's only student-run publication.

The Citizen

Peralta Community College District's only student-run publication.

The Citizen

Abigail McMurry, Acting President of Associated Students of Laney College, spoke against last-minute class cancellations at the May 14 Board of Trustees meeting.
Class cancellations, basic needs, and 'flying pigs' at 5/14 meeting for PCCD Trustees
Ian Waters, News Editor • June 1, 2024
Student Trustee Natasha Masand believes her voice has the power to impact the PCCD community.
Student Trustee Natasha Masand finds her voice
Isabelly Sabô Barbosa, Social Media Editor • March 19, 2024
Archives
Melanie Dixon appointed CoA President
Melanie Dixon appointed CoA President
After two years of acting appointments, the College of Alameda will finally fill the presidency with a permanent hire this summer
Ivan Saravia, Staff Writer • May 23, 2024
College of Alameda jazz professor Glen Pearson demonstrates his musical talent on his classroom piano. Hes one of the newest members of the Count Basie Orchestra, a historic 18-piece jazz ensemble that took home a Grammy this year.
The humble Grammy-winning pianist leading CoA’s music program
Desmond Meagley, Staff Writer • March 4, 2024
Archives

    Pixar shines light on animation

    BCC lecture focuses on stunning visuals

    Pixar is renowned for paving the way in vivid computer animation, pushing the boundaries of technology to new, beautiful, stylized heights.
    From “Toy Story” to “Inside Out,” Pixar films are always well-received and beloved. A whole lot of work goes into creating the stunning visuals that draw in major audiences time and time again. 
    That might be why, when Danielle Feinberg gave a lecture at BCC on Oct. 21, the seats were packed with people of all ages, excited to hear from the Director of Photography for Lighting at Pixar Animation Studios. 
    Feinberg’s lecture, “To Infinity and Beyond: The Math and Science Behind Pixar Films,” gave the audience an in depth behind-the-scenes look at the work that goes into making computer animation look real and alive.

    Pixar

    The enthusiastic presentation included animated slides depicting the often painstaking steps taken to give life to a character’s eyes, find just the right bounce to add to a head of hair, or uncover the perfect combination of dust and water opacity in streams of light.
    One of the most impressive achievements outlined by Feinberg was Pixar’s “Wonder Moss,” a code made of dozens of complicated mathematical equations.
    The Wonder Moss code creates elaborate, life-like vegetation, not strictly limited to moss, with any number of variables to enhance different textures.
    Fienberg worked with the creator of the Wonder Moss code, Iñigo Quilez who now works with Oculus, and referred to him as a genius. Together they spent more than three years working on Pixar’s Brave, studying Scottish foliage to shape the Wonder Moss code. Feinberg jested, in reference to the her now in-depth wisdom on the trees of Scotland, “I have very strange pockets of knowledge, thanks to Pixar.”
    After 18 years and counting of working at Pixar, Feinberg had a lot to share about the science behind the business, and she also spoke about her introduction to animation as a young child. At just eight years old she combined her love of computers and art when she first programed a Logo turtle to create images. 
    Feinberg’s fire for animation led her to earn a Bachelor of Arts in Computer Science from Harvard, and eventually to work for Pixar. She is dedicated to encouraging young women and girls to pursue math, science, and code through the artful beauty of computer animation. 
    “To Infinity and Beyond” was part of the “Not on the Test: The Pleasures and Uses of Mathematics” series presented by BCC and the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, with the support of the Simons Foundation, and each lecture is free and open to the public.

    About the Contributor
    In the fall of 2019, The Laney Tower rebranded as The Citizen and launched a new website. These stories were ported over from the old Laney Tower website, but byline metadata was lost in the port. However, many of these stories credit the authors in the text of the story. Some articles may also suffer from formatting issues. Future archival efforts may fix these issues.  
    Leave a Comment
    Donate to The Citizen
    $0
    $500
    Contributed
    Our Goal

    Comments (0)

    All Sort: Newest

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *