Peralta Community College District's Only Student-Run Publication
Peralta Community College District's only student-run publication.

The Citizen

Peralta Community College District's only student-run publication.

The Citizen

Peralta Community College District's only student-run publication.

The Citizen

Breaking: PCCD appoints former San Leandro police chief to Interim Executive Director of Public Safety
Breaking: PCCD appoints former San Leandro police chief to Interim Executive Director of Public Safety
Abdul Pridgen will lead the district’s community-based safety program
Li Khan, Editor in Chief • June 21, 2024
Carpentry instructor spruces up department
Carpentry instructor spruces up department
Rym-Maya Kherbache, Staff Writer • April 24, 2024
Archives
A cap at the Laney College commencement ceremony on May 24 reads in Spanish, This is for my mom who gave me everything. (Photo: Marcus Creel/PCCD)
Graduations, resignations and more: PCCD Trustees wrap up school year at 5/28 meeting
Romi Bales, Staff Writer • June 17, 2024
Student Trustee Natasha Masand believes her voice has the power to impact the PCCD community.
Student Trustee Natasha Masand finds her voice
Isabelly Sabô Barbosa, Social Media Editor • March 19, 2024
Archives

    Opinion

    Imagine the universe itself as a thin sheet of rubber, stretched flat. When you place an object on the sheet, it sinks down. If you put another smaller object on the sheet, it will slide toward the first object. 
    This is an easy, simple explanation for how gravity works. Now think again about dropping an object onto that sheet. You might see a ripple, similar to what happens when you throw a rock into water. 
    That’s how we might conceptualize gravitational waves. Ripples in the fabric of spacetime, as sci-fi as that might sound, are exactly what scientists at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) have just discovered, and they prove as fact one of Einstein’s last unobserved theories.
    But what does that really mean, and why should anyone who isn’t a physicist care? Other than proving Einstein correct, the ability to detect these waves also brings with it a huge leap in technology and our ability to view the universe, and in turn, uncover its secrets. 
    Up until this point we have only been able to see parts of the universe that are observable via light or electromagnetic waves. The downfall to those methods is their limitation. Gravitational waves differ in a few ways. They don’t appear to decay and they pass right through matter. 
    Using gravitational waves as a sort of “lens” to view the universe through will allow us to see things we could never see before, like merging black holes. Being able to observe previously unobservable phenomena could change or reaffirm everything we know about the universe, and then some.
    The scientists that worked on this discovery were under strict secrecy rules for years. The initial detection was made back in November 2015, but it wasn’t until this past week that LIGO was able to make the announcement. It was worth the wait. 
    The entire world has shared in their joy and excitement since. Hundreds of thousands of people have taken to social media to share the news.
    The excitement about gravitational waves might fade in time, but this breakthrough technology will continue to bring us new discoveries to get excited about all over again. From the moon, to the stars, to the binary black holes, there is still a whole universe out there to see.

    About the Contributor
    In the fall of 2019, The Laney Tower rebranded as The Citizen and launched a new website. These stories were ported over from the old Laney Tower website, but byline metadata was lost in the port. However, many of these stories credit the authors in the text of the story. Some articles may also suffer from formatting issues. Future archival efforts may fix these issues.  
    Leave a Comment
    Donate to The Citizen
    $0
    $500
    Contributed
    Our Goal

    Comments (0)

    All Sort: Newest

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *