Peralta Community College District's Only Student-Run Publication
Peralta Community College District's only student-run publication.

The Citizen

Peralta Community College District's only student-run publication.

The Citizen

Peralta Community College District's only student-run publication.

The Citizen

New Vice President leadership at Laney announced
New Vice President leadership at Laney announced
Besikof selects Lily Espinoza and Ashish Sahni for Laney VP positions
Isabelly Sabô Barbosa, Social Media Editor • May 13, 2024
Student Trustee Natasha Masand believes her voice has the power to impact the PCCD community.
Student Trustee Natasha Masand finds her voice
Isabelly Sabô Barbosa, Social Media Editor • March 19, 2024
Archives
Peralta Trustee Paulina Gonzalez Brito addresses the crowd at Berkeley City College’s 50th anniversary celebration. The event featured a block party along with a groundbreaking ceremony for the college’s new Milvia Street building. (Photo: Marcus Creel/PCCD)
‘We’re still rising’: BCC celebrates 50th anniversary
College throws block party and breaks ground on new building
Sam O'Neil, Associate Editor • May 6, 2024
College of Alameda jazz professor Glen Pearson demonstrates his musical talent on his classroom piano. Hes one of the newest members of the Count Basie Orchestra, a historic 18-piece jazz ensemble that took home a Grammy this year.
The humble Grammy-winning pianist leading CoA’s music program
Desmond Meagley, Staff Writer • March 4, 2024
Archives

    The Women’s March was a dull affair

    It’s celebrated like a holiday, and sometimes a boring holiday is a successful one.

    For all the media buzz around the second Women’s March, I’ve mostly seen it met by shrugs in Oakland. That’s a good thing.

    I don’t mean I’m gleeful that overall turnout is down. Instead, I’m glad the march has new meaning.

    Last year, the march was a miracle. The inauguration of one of the world’s most powerful leaders was overshadowed by an alternate event mocking his authority. That’s big news!

    A growing base has its challenges, but is the fragile Left falling apart? Hardly.

    This year, the march was a holiday; special but not mind-blowing, its ordinariness is a sign of organizational health.

    My mom is a pastor, so I know holidays are hard work. As soon as Christmas is over, you start preparing for Easter. A second Women’s March is impressive, especially when you remember that, like holy days, marches are not most meaningful in themselves, but as invitations.

    Some people who accepted the invitation came for selfies and “The Future Is Female” consumerism; this is America, after all.

    But many connected with day-to-day organizing spent the year alongside long-time activists protesting for DACA, the ACA, Black Lives, divestment, and #MeToo. They shrug because now protesting feels normal.

    They shrug, but this is still a base-building moment. Sacramento’s march almost doubled in attendees this year. The #resistance is spreading. My 91-year-old grandma asked me to explain hashtags because she wants to read “all the stories those ladies are sharing.”

    A growing base has its challenges. Women of color, trans women, cis white women, and hundreds of local organizations struggle to share power. But is the fragile Left falling apart? Hardly.

    The Women’s March is our newest family holiday. Rather than tolerate each other from a distance, the messiness shows the Left practicing community. Sometimes, a boring holiday is a successful holiday. A big-tent gathering like the Women’s March is a like Thanksgiving dinner: both are best evaluated on a scale from “better than expected” to “no longer speaking.”

    This year, we’re still speaking. That’s a good sign!

    —Meg Duff

    About the Contributor
    In the fall of 2019, The Laney Tower rebranded as The Citizen and launched a new website. These stories were ported over from the old Laney Tower website, but byline metadata was lost in the port. However, many of these stories credit the authors in the text of the story. Some articles may also suffer from formatting issues. Future archival efforts may fix these issues.  
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